Reducing Elbow Pain Caused by Casting

For those who only go fishing every now and then, this article may not be as applicable for you as those who are constantly trying to land a trophy unless you play other sports that require lots of repetitive arm motion. Nevertheless, anyone who experiences elbow pain from repetitive activities may find some useful information here.

As the title suggests, we would like to offer a few of our own tips for reducing elbow that is caused by casting or other activities. If you haven’t experienced this type of pain before, you may be wondering why it’s such a big deal. When I first started to show signs of this, I was a little baffled, but assumed it was nothing. Over time, the pain became worse and worse, to the point where casting was actually difficult for me, yet when simply holding the rod I felt almost no pain. After talking with some other experienced anglers, some of which had the same problems in the past, they told me this was actually quite common for those who fish everyday, and it stems from an issue that is common in a lot of other sports and occupations as well.

The fancy term for the condition that leads to this pain is “lateral epicondylitis” or “medial epicondylitis” depending on where in the elbow you feel the pain. This may sound serious and complicated, but it’s actually quite easy to understand. When you perform repetitive movements over long periods of time, such as casting, the tendons that cross over your elbow constantly rub over the bone. Normally this is ok and there is enough lubrication that you don’t even feel it, but with enough repetition, things can start to wear down, and as a result damage and swelling accumulates at the same time, ultimately creating a snowball effect. So what can you do to get back to casting pain-free?

  1. A temporary solution is to take an anti-inflammatory (e.g. Advil) and acetaminophen (e.g. Tylenol) before and after fishing. This might not reduce your pain completely, and it certainly isn’t a long term solution, but it offers a quick fix in the mean time. Just don’t do this all the time. Advil is really tough on the stomach lining and Tylenol is very hard on the liver. Keep this in mind if you are also consuming alcohol!
  2. While this condition is called lateral/medial epicondylitis, a more commonly known name is tennis elbow (lateral) and golfer’s elbow (medial), as these are the sports that most commonly produce this condition. Just like casting in fishing, those sports also involve repetitive movement at the elbow joint. These conditions have been extensively studied, and as such, there are lots of simple little braces you can wear to help reduce pain during activity. A tennis elbow brace and golfers elbow brace act in the exact same fashion. They are small straps with a little bit of padded that loop around your upper forearm. They compress the tendons, which alters the line of pull, and subsequently alleviates the pressure on the damaged or swollen area. The actually work really well, but like Advil and Tylenol, offer a temporary solution. The advantage here is that braces will be more affordable in the long term (just need to buy once, not very expensive) and you aren’t harming any of your internal organs.
  3. Physiotherapy, or very worst case, surgery, represent the best long term solutions for actually treating your condition. Lots of people avoid physiotherapists especially when they don’t have insurance coverage, which is totally understandable. However, even going in for the initial assessment will provide you with a lot of information and direction for how to treat your elbow pain from casting. They will be able to assess how serious the condition is, the best and most practical methods to treat it, as well as more general info for how you can maintain a healthy elbow joint in the future.

Those are the big three tips. Not everyone will experience epicondylitis from casting, but those who do may benefit from this knowledge and taking it seriously before it progresses too far. If you have any doubts, or simply want to learn more, we suggest doing some reading online, as well as visiting your doctor or physiotherapist for an individual assessment.

Good luck out there!

How Different Lures Will Catch You Different Fish

Just like when come to a restaurant, fishes too have a smorgasbord of choices when it comes to food. That’s why, when it comes to fishing lures, you have to tailor it for the fish that you want to catch. You can’t just fix any lure and expect the fist that you want to catch to fall for it. Any recreational fishermen like the Flannel Fishermen will attest to this. If you follow this tip, you can be sure to catch what you set out to catch and when you do, be sure to use the best fishing plier to remove the hook to avoid injuries to your hands.

So how do you choose the best fish lures? There are ways to determine what the fishes are eating for the season and you have to base your lures on this. If your lure is not the same as what the fishes are eating, don’t expect to catch anything.

  1. Match the lure to the type of fish
    To ensure greater success, you must make sure that your lure matches the fish. If you are after for largemouth bass, you can use plastic worms. This comes in various lengths of 4-10 inches. A more versatile lure would be the crankbaits. This is made of hard plastic and is used for various situations.
  2. Look at the lure construction
    Its important that you lure is tough enough to withstand the stress especially if you are going after bigger fishes. Try to look at the constructions and check for weak spots. Try also to find reviews of those who have tried using a lure design.
  3. Consider the fish fooling features
    Fishes can’t resist the movement of the lure when it mimics the movement of real bait. Check that the like tie is located in the right places so that the movement of your lure looks like that of real fish making it irresistible to what you’re trying to catch.

A lot of fishermen prefer lures over baits because its not messy. The only challenge for choosing the lure is that it might not fool the fish into taking it. Make sure that the lure looks convincing enough before you buy it. Another thing that yu need to consider is whether its durable enough to stand the fish’s bite and the force of your pull. If not, then you are likely to loss the fist.

Best Tactical Knives to Carry when Fishing

Whether you’d go for a freshwater fishing or bass fishing, it is always important to think about your safety. There are so many reasons why more and more people are into fishing. Yet, since you’d be in a body of water like a river, lake or as big as the ocean, you need to be extra cautious.

You can find a lot of fishing tips almost everywhere. Yet, not all people are putting much attention about the type of knife to carry when fishing. For you to be able to have the best fishing experience ever, you might find the following tips useful:

fishing

Fishing Safety

When you go for fishing, you’d probably get overwhelmed with the thought of getting your first catch. However, above all, your intention of catching some fish, you also have to know how you would react and what you would do in case you get into trouble. Carrying the right tactical knife primarily would mean better protection.

Spending a few hours on a certain body of water like the river, lake or sea can be dangerous, especially if you aren’t ready when emergencies occur.  And having a good tactical knife will help you a lot and might it might save your life. It can be best for cutting, slicing, or even a makeshift screwdriver.

All About Tactical Knives

You might ask, aren’t all knives the same? They’re sharp and can be used for cutting. But here’s the thing, tactical knives come in different uses and sizes. Some of the important factors that you have to consider when it comes to choosing a tactical knife include the size, the material it is made of, its design and even the blade style. Some of the best options are knives that are full tang and fixed blade.

tactical knife

Some Options

Boker Plus Mosier – It is such a very handy knife to carry. It has a full tang blade design and is 3.25 inches long and overall length is 7.25 inches. It also has an easy grip design.

Spyderco Street Beat – It has a great combination of blade metal and handle material. Very durable and has a polished VG-10 stainless steel blade, 3.5 inches long and a cutting edge of 3.25 inches.

Puma SGB SP Drop Pakkawood – This is often used by campers because it is very durable and easy to carry. Its SGB’s blade is made of 440A German steel, thus, it’s very durable.

Some More Ideas…

Remember, your safety first. Before you even go for fishing and catch some fishes, make sure that you have the right knowledge and even the right tools to use. You can only be safe and protected during troubles if you know what to do. And keep in mind, these tactical knives will not do the magic of protecting you. Everything is in your hands. Choose the best tactical knife to carry and make sure that it can serve you well. And go get some fish!

Beginner’s Guide to Fishing

If you are a beginner in fishing, you can find it quite hard to begin, especially if you don’t have any prior experience at all. However, you shouldn’t be afraid. It’s true that there are fish species that can be hard to catch, but with enough knowledge, skills and gears, nothing is an obstacle.

The very first thing you need to keep in mind is that there are some places that’ll need a fishing license. Ask your local community about it. If you already knew the details, then let’s begin learning how to fish!

Gears and Equipment

If you’re going to fish, you’ll need the proper kind of gears and equipment. If you are going to pick out an equipment, you have to understand the size and species of the fish you want to catch. By knowing this information, you will be able to decide the type of line that you’ll need. If you are going to fish heavier ones, you’ll have to get heavier gears.

The next thing that you need is the rod and the rod must match to the line. Each rod has a recommended line class, lure weight and other important information written on it. Make sure to check compatibilities to ensure a smooth fishing experience. There are three important things to consider when choosing a rod and they are action, length and reel.

  • Action – this is the amount of times the rod flexes. Higher action means that the rod has a greater sensitivity and you’ll feel vibration in your rod easier. However, there’s a catch for fast action rods. Though they will allow you to sense even the slightest nibble, it doesn’t have the power to pull out a big fish. For beginners, a medium action rod provides a good balance to strike the right balance.
  • Length – this one should be determined depending upon the type of fishing that you will do. If you are going to fish from the boat in an open sea or body of water, a longer rod can be useful. A shorter rod is best if you’re going to fish on an area where there might be low hanging branches that can get your hook stuck.
  • Reels – the most common types of reels are spinning reels and bait casting reels. A bait-casting reel requires adjustment of the tension on the spool to eliminate tangling and due to this kind of hard setup; beginners are recommended to get a spinning reel for easier.

Now that you have a basic understanding of lines and rods, let’s go to the lures and bait. It is important to understand your target species to go after them with the right lure. Lookup your target species and check the right kind of lure for them.

Casting

Now, we are going to cast using a spinning reel:

  1. With your index finger, hold the line against the rod.
  2. Open the bale with your other hand (this is the wire cage that opens and closes the reel).
  3. Throw your lure out while letting your finger off the rod as you release the line. The lure’s weight will do the job of sending the line out.
  4. Wait…
  5. And catch!